Do i need a title for my college essay

What do you put on top of an essay?

Details about the essay Instead, add the following essay information in the top left-hand corner of the first page: your complete name, the instructor’s name, the course, and the date. Your title should be centered on the line following the date, and your essay should begin on the line following that. There should be a space of at least 7 points between your name and the beginning of your essay.

In addition to this basic information, there are two other pieces of paper you should always include with your essay: an abstract and a list of references. An abstract is a brief summary of the topic covered in the essay written in plain language for someone who has never heard of it before. It should not exceed 250 words. A reference list is a compilation of books, articles, websites, and other sources used by the author while writing her essay. These items should be listed in order of importance with the most relevant or significant items first. Each source should be described briefly, including how much of the essay it covers. For example, if a source is an article that can be read in less than 15 minutes, then it should be listed as covering “less than 15 minutes” of material.

Finally, you should know that some professors may have additional requirements for essays. If there is a list of suggestions at the end of this chapter, then you will want to make sure you follow them.

Table of Contents

How do you start an essay?

As a “header,” provide your name and the page number. Do not type this information where your essay’s text should be. A title should be included in your essay. The title should be centered and appear above the first line of your essay, under the header information on the first page. Some writers like to use subheads to divide their essays into sections. Each section should have a unique title, which can be used as a subtitle for that section.

The body of the essay should include information that supports the thesis statement and discusses other issues related to the topic. Information may include examples, statistics, cases, questions, comments, or anything else that helps explain or support the argument being made.

The conclusion is a summary of the main points raised in the essay. It should not contain any new information nor should it repeat facts stated earlier in the essay. Instead, the conclusion should reflect on the arguments made in the essay and offer a final comment or opinion about the topic.

Essays are usually assigned as part of a course requirement, so they should be written specifically to meet those requirements. However, this does not mean that students should not enjoy writing them. If you do not feel challenged by the assignment, you might want to look at other topics or courses of study for greater satisfaction.

When writing an essay, it is important to be clear and concise without boring the reader.

What should the format of a college essay be?

Guidelines for General College Essay Formatting

  • There’s no need for a title; it takes up unnecessary space and eats into your word count.
  • Stay within the word count as much as possible (+/- 10% of the upper limit).
  • Indent or double space to separate paragraphs clearly.

What is the best choice for the title of an essay?

Make an effort to be precise and explicit. The basic purpose of any essay title is to give the document a name. It doesn’t imply you have to convey the complete thing at the start. Consider writing a brief summary. This will help you include more information while keeping it concise.

Use proper grammar and language usage. A manuscript that is well written in terms of sentence structure and vocabulary quality is likely to attract readers’ attention too.

Include relevant details but not more than necessary. Since essay titles serve as summaries of the articles, they need to be clear and concise. Therefore, don’t include information that isn’t essential to understanding the subject.

Make sure it’s accurate and current. Remember, readers tend to ignore words that are not common knowledge. If you use terminology that is not familiar to most people, they will find your essay difficult to understand.

Create a unique title. You should try to come up with a title that neither implies nor conveys anything about the content of your article. For example, “The color red” is not a good title because it gives no indication about the topic under discussion. “Why I am not going to Las Vegas” on the other hand, does suggest what the article is going to be about.

What should the title of an essay give hints about?

The title should be able to forecast the essay’s content, be engaging to the reader, and represent the writer’s feelings or tone. A good title should consequently allude to the reader’s emotions, ideals, or interests. It should also provide sufficient information for others to understand what the essay is about. Generally, titles should be short and to the point.

Some examples of interesting essay titles are: “My Favorite Teacher”, “Why I Want To Be A Writer”, “How My Parents’ Divorce Affected Me As a Child”. These titles give readers a good idea of what they will find in their minds when reading the essays. They also make it easy for them to select which essays to read. Of course, you can use more than one title on one page if you want to give different readers a chance to find their favorite topic.

It is up to you how you want to structure your essay but as a general rule, the title should help readers understand what they will find in the body of the essay itself. For example, if you were writing about your favorite teacher, you could talk about him/her for several paragraphs before finally getting around to saying that his/her appearance makes you feel sad every time you think about him/her retiring. In this case, the title would help readers anticipate what they will find in the essay by giving them some indication of its focus.

How do you write a good essay title?

Here are some elements to keep in mind for your title:

  1. Your Title should be an attention grabber.
  2. It reflects the tone of your essay.
  3. Your readers need to be able to understand what your essay is about.
  4. It should contain some main keywords from your essay.

How do you write an English essay format?

Using paragraphs from our interactive essay example, we walk you through what to include in the introduction, body, and conclusion of an academic essay. Creating an introduction

College Essay Titles: Are They Important?

Are you a freshman, sophomore, or junior? Our College Planning Boot Camp will put you in the best position for college admissions success.

If you’re reading this, you are probably writing your college essays. Writing, drafting, revising, and proofreading your essays all play really important roles in the process.

One of the finishing touches on most pieces of writing is a title – but do you need one in a college essay? This guide gives you all the information you’ll need!

Are college essay titles important?

To be blunt: not really. The most important part of a college essay is the essay itself. Your essay should be personal, insightful, creative, and meticulously proofread. They do not need to be titled.

However, this doesn’t mean that a title is a bad idea. A title for your college essay falls under the “nice to have” category. A title isn’t something that an application reader will be looking for, but a well-done title can really help tie your essay together, especially if you have room in your word count for one.

How to think of a great college essay title

A title for any piece of writing should be brief, clever, and creative. Most importantly for college essays, they should add something to your piece. College essays often have a limited word count, so if you are going to be using some of the words for a title, it’s important to make sure it’s worth it!

To begin brainstorming a great college essay title, close your eyes. Think about your essay holistically. Likely you have been working on a micro-level of editing and revising: word choice, sentence structure, and other small-level changes. Try and zoom out.

What is the big picture of your essay? What is the major lesson you learned? Or, perhaps, what is the funniest part – what could be an exciting hook for your reader? Try and brainstorm a list of these ideas. Don’t worry about being brief yet.

Once you have an idea you like, workshop it down. Try and make your title as short as you can without sacrificing substance.

It might also be a good idea to ask some friends, family members, or teachers for advice. Sometimes it’s easier to see the big picture of an essay if you weren’t the person who actually wrote it.

Examples of poor college essay titles

A bad essay title is wordy, confusing, or just plain boring. Restating the essay prompt in a title, or an essay for that matter, is a waste of words and time. Avoid titles that sound like the following:

  • “My Most Memorable Moment” – boring
  • “The Importance of Finding Community in Unlikely Places” – boring and wordy
  • “Why I Want to Attend [University Name]” – boring
  • “Cars and Lessons” – confusing and vague, doesn’t add anything to the piece

Examples of great college essay titles

So, what does a good college essay title sound like? Great college essay titles are quippy, creative, interesting, and/or add something new to your essay. Here are some examples:

  • “Found Family, French Fries, and Football” – the alliteration shows some extra thought put into titling the essay. This title already tells a reader this will likely be about the author finding a community in a football team, but leaves the reader wondering how french fries factor into it all.
  • “Y-whay I-way Ove-lay Ig-pay Atin-lay” – this falls under the “creative” category. That title uses “Pig Latin,” a made-up “language” many people are likely familiar with. Once translated, this also piques the reader’s interest; how will Pig Latin be relevant in a college essay?
  • “It’s The Lemurs” – this title is for an essay answering “Why Do You Want To Attend Our School,” and the author chose to write about the university’s lemur research center. This is a short and surprising title, and definitely leaves the reader wanting to know more!

Conclusion: College Essay Titles

When push comes to shove, your essay is your essay, and you know it best. If you feel certain that the best title for your essay breaks one of the above rules, that’s okay. Our guidelines are just that: guidelines.

Hopefully, this guide helps you understand the purpose of college essay titles and how to come up with good ones. Remember, essay titles for college applications are certainly not necessary, but can add a lot if done correctly.

College Essay Titles: Are They Important?

Are you a freshman, sophomore, or junior? Our College Planning Boot Camp will put you in the best position for college admissions success.

If you’re reading this, you are probably writing your college essays. Writing, drafting, revising, and proofreading your essays all play really important roles in the process.

One of the finishing touches on most pieces of writing is a title – but do you need one in a college essay? This guide gives you all the information you’ll need!

Are college essay titles important?

To be blunt: not really. The most important part of a college essay is the essay itself. Your essay should be personal, insightful, creative, and meticulously proofread. They do not need to be titled.

However, this doesn’t mean that a title is a bad idea. A title for your college essay falls under the “nice to have” category. A title isn’t something that an application reader will be looking for, but a well-done title can really help tie your essay together, especially if you have room in your word count for one.

How to think of a great college essay title

A title for any piece of writing should be brief, clever, and creative. Most importantly for college essays, they should add something to your piece. College essays often have a limited word count, so if you are going to be using some of the words for a title, it’s important to make sure it’s worth it!

To begin brainstorming a great college essay title, close your eyes. Think about your essay holistically. Likely you have been working on a micro-level of editing and revising: word choice, sentence structure, and other small-level changes. Try and zoom out.

What is the big picture of your essay? What is the major lesson you learned? Or, perhaps, what is the funniest part – what could be an exciting hook for your reader? Try and brainstorm a list of these ideas. Don’t worry about being brief yet.

Once you have an idea you like, workshop it down. Try and make your title as short as you can without sacrificing substance.

It might also be a good idea to ask some friends, family members, or teachers for advice. Sometimes it’s easier to see the big picture of an essay if you weren’t the person who actually wrote it.

Examples of poor college essay titles

A bad essay title is wordy, confusing, or just plain boring. Restating the essay prompt in a title, or an essay for that matter, is a waste of words and time. Avoid titles that sound like the following:

  • “My Most Memorable Moment” – boring
  • “The Importance of Finding Community in Unlikely Places” – boring and wordy
  • “Why I Want to Attend [University Name]” – boring
  • “Cars and Lessons” – confusing and vague, doesn’t add anything to the piece

Examples of great college essay titles

So, what does a good college essay title sound like? Great college essay titles are quippy, creative, interesting, and/or add something new to your essay. Here are some examples:

  • “Found Family, French Fries, and Football” – the alliteration shows some extra thought put into titling the essay. This title already tells a reader this will likely be about the author finding a community in a football team, but leaves the reader wondering how french fries factor into it all.
  • “Y-whay I-way Ove-lay Ig-pay Atin-lay” – this falls under the “creative” category. That title uses “Pig Latin,” a made-up “language” many people are likely familiar with. Once translated, this also piques the reader’s interest; how will Pig Latin be relevant in a college essay?
  • “It’s The Lemurs” – this title is for an essay answering “Why Do You Want To Attend Our School,” and the author chose to write about the university’s lemur research center. This is a short and surprising title, and definitely leaves the reader wanting to know more!

Conclusion: College Essay Titles

When push comes to shove, your essay is your essay, and you know it best. If you feel certain that the best title for your essay breaks one of the above rules, that’s okay. Our guidelines are just that: guidelines.

Hopefully, this guide helps you understand the purpose of college essay titles and how to come up with good ones. Remember, essay titles for college applications are certainly not necessary, but can add a lot if done correctly.

How to Format a College Essay: Step-by-Step Guide

At College Essay Guy, we too like good stories well told.

The problem is that sometimes students have really good stories … that just aren’t well told.

They have the seed of an idea and the makings of a great story, but the essay formatting or structure is all over the place.

Which can lead a college admissions reader to see you as disorganized. And your essay doesn’t make as much of an impact as it could.

So, if you’re here, you’re probably wondering:

Is there any kind of required format for a college essay? How do I structure my essay?

And maybe what’s the difference?

Good news: That’s what this post answers.

First, let’s go over a few basic questions students often have when trying to figure out how to format their essay.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  • College essay format guidelines
  • How to brainstorm and structure a college essay topic

College Essay Format Guidelines

Should I title my college essay?

You don’t need one. In the vast majority of cases, students we work with don’t use titles. The handful of times they have, they’ve done so because the title allows for a subtle play on words or reframing of the essay as a whole. So don’t feel any pressure to include one—they’re purely optional.

Should I indent or us paragraph breaks in my college essay?

Either. Just be consistent. The exception here is if you’re pasting into a box that screws up your formatting—for example, if, when you copy your essay into the box, your indentations are removed, go with paragraph breaks. (And when you get to college, be sure to check what style guide you should be following: Chicago, APA, MLA, etc., can all take different approaches to formatting, and different fields have different standards.)

How many paragraphs should a college essay be?

Personal statements are not English essays. They don’t need to be 5 paragraphs with a clear, argumentative thesis in the beginning and a conclusion that sums everything up. So feel free to break from that. How many paragraphs are appropriate for a college essay? Within reason, it’s up to you. We’ve seen some great personal statements that use 4 paragraphs, and some that use 8 or more (especially if you have dialogue—yes, dialogue is OK too!).

How long should my college essay be?

The good news is that colleges and the application systems they use will usually give you specific word count maximums. The most popular college application systems, like the Common Application and Coalition Application, will give you a maximum of 650 words for your main personal statement, and typically less than that for school-specific supplemental essays. Other systems will usually specify the maximum word count—the UC PIQs are 350 max, for example. If they don’t specify this clearly in the application systems or on their website (and be sure to do some research), you can email them to ask! They don’t bite.

So should you use all that space? We generally recommend it. You likely have lots to share about your life, so we think that not using all the space they offer to tell your story might be a missed opportunity. While you don’t have to use every last word, aim to use most of the words they give you. But don’t just fill the space if what you’re sharing doesn’t add to the overall story you’re telling.

There are also some applications or supplementals with recommended word counts or lengths. For example, Georgetown says things like “approx. 1 page,” and UChicago doesn’t have a limit, but recommends aiming for 650ish for the extended essay, and 250-500 for the “Why us?”

You can generally apply UChicago’s recommendations to other schools that don’t give you a limit: If it’s a “Why Major” supplement, 650 is probably plenty, and for other supplements, 250-500 is a good target to shoot for. If you go over those, that can be fine, just be sure you’re earning that word count (as in, not rambling or being overly verbose). Your readers are humans. If you send them a tome, their attention could drift.

Regarding things like italics and bold

Keep in mind that if you’re pasting text into a box, it may wipe out your formatting. So if you were hoping to rely on italics or bold for some kind of emphasis, double check if you’ll be able to. (And in general, try to use sentence structure and phrasing to create that kind of emphasis anyway, rather than relying on bold or italics—doing so will make you a better writer.)

Regarding font type, size, and color

Keep it simple and standard. Regarding font type, things like Times New Roman or Georgia (what this is written in) won’t fail you. Just avoid things like Comic Sans or other informal/casual fonts.

Size? 11- or 12-point is fine.

Going with something else with the above could be a risk, possibly a big one, for fairly little gain. Things like a wacky font or text color could easily feel gimmicky to a reader.

To stand out with your writing, take some risks in what you write about and the connections and insights you make.

If you’re attaching a doc (rather than pasting)

If you are attaching a document rather than pasting into a text box, all the above still applies. Again, we’d recommend sticking with standard fonts and sizes—Times New Roman, 12-point is a standard workhorse. You can probably go with 1.5 or double spacing. Standard margins.

Basically, show them you’re ready to write in college by using the formatting you’ll normally use in college.

Is there a college essay template I can use?

Depends on what you’re asking for. If, by “template,” you’re referring to formatting … see above.

But if you mean a structural template . not exactly. There is no one college essay template to follow. And that’s a good thing.

That said, we’ve found that there are two basic structural approaches to writing college essays that can work for every single prompt we’ve seen. (Except for lists. Because … they’re lists.)

Below we’ll cover those two essay structures we love, but you’ll see how flexible these are—they can lead to vastly different essays. You can also check out a few sample essays to get a sense of structure and format (though we’d recommend doing some brainstorming and outlining to think of possible topics before you look at too many samples, since they can poison the well for some people).

STEP 1: HOW TO BRAINSTORM AN AMAZING ESSAY TOPIC

We’ll talk about structure and topic together. Why? Because one informs the other.

(And to clarify: When we say, “topic,” we mean the theme or focus of your essay that you use to show who you are and what you value. The “topic” of your college essay is always ultimately you.)

We think there are two basic structural approaches that can work for any college essay. Not that these are the only two options—rather, that these can work for any and every prompt you’ll have to write for.

Which structural approach you use depends on your answer to this question (and its addendum): Do you feel like you’ve faced significant challenges in your life … or not so much? (And do you want to write about them?)

If yes (to both), you’ll most likely want to use Narrative Structure.
If no (to either), you’ll probably want to try Montage Structure.

So … what are those structures? And how do they influence your topic?

Narrative Structure is classic storytelling structure. You’ve seen this thousands of times—assuming you read, and watch movies and TV, and tell stories with friends and family. If you don’t do any of these things, this might be new. Otherwise, you already know this. You may just not know you know it. Narrative revolves around a character or characters (for a college essay, that’s you) working to overcome certain challenges, learning and growing, and gaining insight. For a college essay using Narrative Structure, you’ll focus the word count roughly equally on a) Challenges You Faced, b) What You Did About Them, and c) What You Learned (caveat that those sections can be somewhat interwoven, especially b and c). Paragraphs and events are connected causally.

You’ve also seen montages before. But again, you may not know you know. So: A montage is a series of thematically connected things, frequently images. You’ve likely seen montages in dozens and dozens of films before—in romantic comedies, the “here’s the couple meeting and dating and falling in love” montage; in action movies, the classic “training” montage. A few images tell a larger story. In a college essay, you could build a montage by using a thematic thread to write about five different pairs of pants that connect to different sides of who you are and what you value. Or different but connected things that you love and know a lot about (like animals, or games). Or entries in your Happiness Spreadsheet.

How does structure play into a great topic?

We believe a montage essay (i.e., an essay NOT about challenges) is more likely to stand out if the topic or theme of the essay is:

X. Elastic (i.e., something you can connect to variety of examples, moments, or values)
Y. Uncommon (i.e., something other students probably aren’t writing about)

We believe that a narrative essay is more likely to stand out if it contains:

X. Difficult or compelling challenges
Y. Insight

These aren’t binary—rather, each exists on a spectrum.

“Elastic” will vary from person to person. I might be able to connect mountain climbing to family, history, literature, science, social justice, environmentalism, growth, insight … and someone else might not connect it to much of anything. Maybe trees?

“Uncommon”—every year, thousands of students write about mission trips, sports, or music. It’s not that you can’t write about these things, but it’s a lot harder to stand out.

“Difficult or compelling challenges” can be put on a spectrum, with things like getting a bad grade or not making a sports team on the weaker end, and things like escaping war or living homeless for three years on the stronger side. While you can possibly write a strong essay about a weaker challenge, it’s really hard to do so.

“Insight” is the answer to the question “so what?” A great insight is likely to surprise the reader a bit, while a so-so insight likely won’t. (Insight is something you’ll develop in an essay through the writing process, rather than something you’ll generally know ahead of time for a topic, but it’s useful to understand that some topics are probably easier to pull insights from than others.)

To clarify, you can still write a great montage with a very common topic, or a narrative that offers so-so insights. But the degree of difficulty goes up. Probably way up.

With that in mind, how do you brainstorm possible topics that are on the easier-to-stand-out-with side of the spectrum?

Brainstorming exercises

Spend about 10 minutes (minimum) on each of these exercises.

If you feel like you already have your topic, and you just want to know how to make it better…

Still do those exercises.

Maybe what you have is the best topic for you. And if you are incredibly super sure, you can skip ahead. But if you’re not sure this topic helps you communicate your deepest stories, spend a little time on the exercises above. As a bonus, even if you end up going with what you already had (though please be wary of the sunk cost fallacy), all that brainstorming will be useful when you write your supplemental essays.

The Feelings and Needs Exercise in particular is great for brainstorming Narrative Structure, connecting story events in a causal way (X led to Y led to Z). The Essence Objects, 21 Details, Everything I Want Colleges to Know exercises can lead to interesting thematic threads for Montage Structure (P, Q, and R are all connected because, for example, they’re all qualities of a great endodontist). But all of them are useful for both structural approaches. Essence objects can help a narrative come to life. One paragraph in a montage could focus on a challenge and how you overcame it.

The Values Exercise is a cornerstone of both—regardless of whether you use narrative or montage, we should get a sense of some of your core values through your essays.

How (and why) to outline your college essay to use a good structure

While not every professional writer knows exactly how a story will end when they start writing, they also have months (or years) to craft it, and they may throw major chunks or whole drafts away. You probably don’t want to throw away major chunks or whole drafts. So you should outline.

Use the brainstorming exercises from earlier to decide on your most powerful topics and what structure (narrative or montage) will help you best tell your story.

For a narrative, use the Feelings and Needs Exercise, and build clear bullet points for the Challenges + Effects, What I Did About It, and What I Learned. Those become your outline.

Yeah, that simple.

For a montage, outline 4-7 ways your thread connects to different values through different experiences, and if you can think of them, different lessons and insights (though these you might have to develop later, during the writing process). For example, how auto repair connects to family, literature, curiosity, adventure, and personal growth (through different details and experiences).

Here are some good example outlines:

Narrative outline (developed from the Feelings and Needs Exercise)

Domestic abuse (physical and verbal)

Controlling father/lack of freedom

Prevented from pursuing opportunities

Cut off from world/family

Lack of sense of freedom/independence

What I Did About It:

Pursued my dreams

Traveled to Egypt, London, and Paris alone

Explored new places and cultures

Developed self-confidence, independence, and courage

Grew as a leader

Inspired to help others a lot more

Learned about oppression, and how to challenge oppressive norms

Became closer with mother, somewhat healed relationship with father

Need to feel free

And here’s the essay that became: “Easter

Values: Family, tradition, literature

Ex: “Tailgate Special,” discussions w/family, reading Nancy Drew

Perception, connection to family

Chinese sword dance

Values: Culture/heritage, meticulousness, dedication, creativity

Ex: Notebook, formations/choreography

Nuances of culture, power of connection

Values: Science/chemistry, curiosity

Synthesizing plat nanoparticles

Joy of discovery, redefining expectations

Values: Exploration, personal growth

Knitting, physics, politics, etc.

Importance of exploring beyond what I know/am used to, taking risks

And here’s the essay that became: “Home”

When to scrap what you have and start over

Ultimately, you can’t know for sure if a topic will work until you try a draft or two. And maybe it’ll be great. But keep that sunk cost fallacy in mind, and be open to trying other things.

If you’re down the rabbit hole with a personal statement topic and just aren’t sure about it, the first step you should take is to ask for feedback. Find a partner who can help you examine it without the attachment to all the emotion (anxiety, worry, or fear) you might have built up around it.

Have them help you walk through The Great College Essay Test to make sure your essay is doing its job. If it isn’t yet, does it seem like this topic has the potential to? Or would other topics allow you to more fully show a college who you are and what you bring to the table?

Because that’s your goal. Format and structure are just tools to get you there.

Down the Road

Before we analyze some sample essays, bookmark this page, so that once you’ve gone through several drafts of your own essay, come back and take The Great College Essay Test to make sure your essay is doing its job. The job of the essay, simply put, is to demonstrate to a college that you’ll make valuable contributions in college and beyond. We believe these four qualities are essential to a great essay:

Core values (showing who you are through what you value)

Vulnerability (helps a reader feel connected to you)

Insight (aka “so what” moments)

Craft (clear structure, refined language, intentional choices)

To test what values are coming through, read your essay aloud to someone who knows you and ask:

Which values are clearly coming through the essay?

Which values are kind of there but could be coming through more clearly?

Which values could be coming through and were opportunities missed?

To know if you’re being vulnerable in your essay, ask:

Now that you’ve heard my story, do you feel closer to me?

What did you learn about me that you didn’t already know?

To search for “so what” moments of insight, review the claims you’re making in your essay. Are you reflecting on what these moments and experiences taught you? How have they changed you? Are you making common or (hopefully) uncommon connections? The uncommon connections are often made up of insights that are unusual or unexpected. (For more on how to test for this, click The Great College Essay Test link above.)

Craft comes through the sense that each paragraph, each sentence, each word is a carefully considered choice. That the author has spent time revising and refining. That the essay is interesting and succinct. How do you test this? For each paragraph, each sentence, each word, ask: Do I need this? (Huge caveat: Please avoid neurotic perfectionism here. We’re just asking you to be intentional with your language.)

Still feeling you haven’t found your topic? Here’s a list of 100 Brave and Interesting Questions. Read these and try freewriting on a few. See where they lead.

Finally, here’s an .

Example College Essay Format Analysis:
The “Burying Grandma” Essay

To see how the Narrative Essay structure works, check out the essay below, which was written for the Common App “Topic of your choice” prompt. You might try reading it here first before reading the paragraph-by-paragraph breakdown below.

They covered the precious mahogany coffin with a brown amalgam of rocks, decomposed organisms, and weeds. It was my turn to take the shovel, but I felt too ashamed to dutifully send her off when I had not properly said goodbye. I refused to throw dirt on her. I refused to let go of my grandmother, to accept a death I had not seen coming, to believe that an illness could not only interrupt, but steal a beloved life.

The author begins by setting up the Challenges + Effects (you’ve maybe heard of this referred to in narrative as the Inciting Incident). This moment also sets up some of her needs: growth and emotional closure, to deal with it and let go/move on. Notice the way objects like the shovel help bring an essay to life, and can be used for symbolic meaning. That object will also come back later.

When my parents finally revealed to me that my grandmother had been battling liver cancer, I was twelve and I was angry–mostly with myself. They had wanted to protect me–only six years old at the time–from the complex and morose concept of death. However, when the end inevitably arrived, I wasn’t trying to comprehend what dying was; I was trying to understand how I had been able to abandon my sick grandmother in favor of playing with friends and watching TV. Hurt that my parents had deceived me and resentful of my own oblivion, I committed myself to preventing such blindness from resurfacing.

In the second paragraph, she flashes back to give us some context of what things were like leading up to these challenges (i.e., the Status Quo), which helps us understand her world. It also helps us to better understand the impact of her grandmother’s death and raises a question: How will she prevent such blindness from resurfacing?

I became desperately devoted to my education because I saw knowledge as the key to freeing myself from the chains of ignorance. While learning about cancer in school I promised myself that I would memorize every fact and absorb every detail in textbooks and online medical journals. And as I began to consider my future, I realized that what I learned in school would allow me to silence that which had silenced my grandmother. However, I was focused not with learning itself, but with good grades and high test scores. I started to believe that academic perfection would be the only way to redeem myself in her eyes–to make up for what I had not done as a granddaughter.

In the third paragraph, she starts shifting into the What I Did About It aspect, and takes off at a hundred miles an hour … but not quite in the right direction yet. What does that mean? She pursues things that, while useful and important in their own right, won’t actually help her resolve her conflict. This is important in narrative—while it can be difficult, or maybe even scary, to share ways we did things wrong, that generally makes for a stronger story. Think of it this way: You aren’t really interested in watching a movie in which a character faces a challenge, knows what to do the whole time, so does it, the end. We want to see how people learn and change and grow.

Here, the author “Raises the Stakes” because we as readers sense intuitively (and she is giving us hints) that this is not the way to get over her grandmother’s death.

However, a simple walk on a hiking trail behind my house made me open my own eyes to the truth. Over the years, everything–even honoring my grandmother–had become second to school and grades. As my shoes humbly tapped against the Earth, the towering trees blackened by the forest fire a few years ago, the faintly colorful pebbles embedded in the sidewalk, and the wispy white clouds hanging in the sky reminded me of my small though nonetheless significant part in a larger whole that is humankind and this Earth. Before I could resolve my guilt, I had to broaden my perspective of the world as well as my responsibilities to my fellow humans.

There’s some nice evocative detail in here that helps draw us into her world and experience.

Structurally, there are elements of What I Did About It and What I Learned in here (again, they will often be somewhat interwoven). This paragraph gives us the Turning Point/Moment of Truth. She begins to understand how she was wrong. She realizes she needs perspective. But how? See next paragraph .

Volunteering at a cancer treatment center has helped me discover my path. When I see patients trapped in not only the hospital but also a moment in time by their diseases, I talk to them. For six hours a day, three times a week, Ivana is surrounded by IV stands, empty walls, and busy nurses that quietly yet constantly remind her of her breast cancer. Her face is pale and tired, yet kind–not unlike my grandmother’s. I need only to smile and say hello to see her brighten up as life returns to her face. Upon our first meeting, she opened up about her two sons, her hometown, and her knitting group–no mention of her disease. Without even standing up, the three of us—Ivana, me, and my grandmother–had taken a walk together.

In the second-to-last paragraph, we see how she takes further action, and some of what she learns from her experiences: Volunteering at the local hospital helps her see her larger place in the world.

Cancer, as powerful and invincible as it may seem, is a mere fraction of a person’s life. It’s easy to forget when one’s mind and body are so weak and vulnerable. I want to be there as an oncologist to remind them to take a walk once in a while, to remember that there’s so much more to life than a disease. While I physically treat their cancer, I want to lend patients emotional support and mental strength to escape the interruption and continue living. Through my work, I can accept the shovel without burying my grandmother’s memory.

The final paragraph uses what we call the “bookend” technique by bringing us back to the beginning, but with a change—she’s a different, slightly wiser person than she was. This helps us put a frame around her growth.

Free Essay Title Generator

Try Essay Topic Generator by PapersOwl to find creative titles for your academics papers.

How to use topic generator:

  • Begin typing words related to your essay topic in the keyword section
  • Select the subject from the category section as needed
  • View the variations generated and inform our writers which you would like them to use on your essay

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Free Essay Title Generator

Creating titles for your papers can be one of the toughest tasks. Sometimes, the document name is chosen for you – the teacher may pre-determine the title. If this is the case, the problem solved! Oftentimes, however, you have to choose the title for yourself. This is where difficulties can start. For example, you may be given a dissertation – this gives you free rein in a certain subject – you can literally choose the subject.

Let’s say you are studying history. The central subject is World War 2. How do you even begin to start choosing a particular subject for this event? World War 2 is such an expansive and detailed time-era – the possibilities are endless. This is why using an essay title generator online is beneficial. In this article, we look at why using a free paper title generator tool could help your studies or writing our research paper.

How Can Essay Title Generator Help You?

You may wonder why using a topic generator for an essay is beneficial. There are numerous ways that you can prosper. As stated above, if you are given free rein to choose your own title, the task can be overwhelming. Where do you start? How do you narrow down a whole subject into one single line of text? By using the title maker for essay assignments and an academic essay, you can remove the stress. You can literally enter the desired keywords and be presented with a list of potential ideas in seconds.

This, of course, gives you more time actually researching, planning, and writing the document. Precious time can be wasted thinking of a subject line. By using this tool, you can remove any unnecessary time wastage and get straight to the work!

Furthermore, using this tool can help your creativity. There are hundreds and thousands of exiting assignments. Choosing a unique and interesting topic can be difficult. Using the tool, you can see a list of ideas and then formulate your own fantastic title from this list.

How To Use Our Essay Idea Generator

So how do you actually use the essay topic generator? It is quite a simple process! The following are the steps that you must take:

  • Open the Tooly free essay topic generator
  • Type in associated keywords to your subject
  • Use the drop-down list to select a category
  • Look at the list of topics displayed
  • Press, “load more” to see additional titles

As you can see, the process couldn’t be easier! From opening the website and clicking the “look for topic” button, you can complete the whole process in less than a minute.

What Types of Papers Are Supported

If you are worried that your document won’t be supported then fear not! The topic generator for essay supports a vast array of types including (but not limited to):

  • Research paper
  • Personal essay
  • Persuasive essay
  • Argumentative essay
  • Compare and contrast essay
  • Academic essay
  • College essay

It also supports common types such as thesis, dissertation, and term paper. The database is continually being filled with new subjects and topics too. For example, the following subjects are currently supported:

  • Science
  • Philosophy
  • Travel
  • World History
  • Education
  • Mathematics
  • Language
  • Law
  • Economics

No matter what subject you are studying, this tool will have a large list of titles for you to utilize. As you will see below, the benefits are numerous and this free paper title generator is a cut above the rest.

Why Choose Our Essay Title Maker?

Now you should understand what we have to offer and how you can benefit. But what makes this tool a standout choice? The following are some of the main reasons why you should use this essay topic generator:

  • Exceptionally fast website and processing time
  • A straightforward process that anyone can follow
  • Immense database packed full of titles
  • New information is added on a regular basis
  • Many types of essay type covered such as academic essay
  • Many studying subjects covered such as law, science, and sociology
  • Unique and interesting topics to choose from

The combination of a fantastic and easy to use the website, together with the complete nature of our database really does give you a superb end product. The database will continue to grow, therefore the service should only improve as time progresses.

Don’t struggle with your topics! Make use of this superb essay idea generator. You can use it completely free of charge. As a result, your college essay and other types of paper will be much more varied and interesting. You can then concentrate on the work itself and use your skills to produce an exceptional end product with a fantastic title. Why not give this amazing essay title generator online a try today and see what excellent subjects you can find?

How to Title an Essay, Complete Guide

A title can make or break an essay. So, what are the most eye-catching ideas to make a target audience want to start reading your paper? The goal of this article is to explain how to title an essay, research paper, article, and even a book.

Having problems with writing a title for an essay? Let EssayPro’s professional essay writing service team know, and our experienced academic writers will offer you the best examples and papers written from scratch!

How to Choose a Good Title for an Essay and Why Is It Important?

A boring headline does not catch anyone’s attention. Your headline should engage your teacher or reader and incentivize them to read the rest of the paper. Without reading the entire work, a teacher will not grade it objectively. Having a catchy attention grabber is crucial when writing an essay, as it is one of the first things that readers notice.

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Naming an essay is different from titling a research paper. An essay focuses more on attracting attention and impressing its readers. A research paper is about supporting a particular claim or finding solutions to an existing problem.

Every student should know how to choose a good title for an essay. Brainstorming is what comes first. When brainstorming, keep in mind that your goal is to get the “Oh my god, I want to read the entire story” reaction. After reading the title, a reader should understand what the paper is about. The title is a concise summary of the main topic. How long should a title be for an essay? Well, less is always better, but the title should indeed express the main point of your work.

Before starting to sort ideas out in your head, let’s learn more about the features every title should have. A good headline must be:

  • Attractive – this goes without saying. We all prefer reading something that is not boring.
  • Believable – most students try to make their titles catchy in such a way that they stray away from the truth, therefore making the headline inaccurate. Nothing will anger your professor more than a title that doesn’t deliver.
  • Easy to read – nobody likes complicated and difficult-to-understand titles, not even your professor. Stay away from strange phrases, jargon, and complicated structures.
  • Active voice – if your title contains verbs, always make sure they’re in the active voice, rather than passive.
  • Short – make your essay title brief because long headlines can be confusing.
  • Accurate – regardless of the topic or niche, under no circumstances should you ever write an inaccurate essay title.

things that must be in a good headline

Here are other rules for how to create a good title:

  • Title every section of writing: In the process of writing, create interesting subheadings to give your paragraphs an identity. Also, they make your text look ordered and clear.
  • The title must bear the theme of the text: choose a title that summarizes the essay.
  • Capitalize all words with certain exceptions: Capitalize the first letter of every word in the title, but do not capitalize pronouns, articles, prepositions, and conjunctions.
  • Avoid underlining the title: Since topics come in boldface, underlining it will amount to overemphasis. Some authorities say that if you must underline it, do not bolden it.
  • Review the final version of the title: Do not forget to do a quick review of the final version of the title—check for grammar, structure, spelling and so on. Re-read it to determine if the title has given justice to the essay. Confirm if the topic is catchy enough to attract your reader’s attention.
  • When using a colon in your title, follow the rules: Since we are dealing with punctuation rules here, let us talk about the colon – when you have two eye-catching topics, separate them with a colon.

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How to Come up with a Title for an Essay: Student’s Guide

Titling an essay can be easy, but there are a few core principles to be taken into account. The following tips will help you stay on track and avoid any common pitfalls.

Never start with a title! If you write it before the rest of the text, it will be based on it, and it should be vice versa. Writing an essay before choosing a heading will give you a clear understanding of what should make sense to the reader. Re-read the finished paper several times to decide on the title.
The last thing to create is a title – such strategy will give more time to spend on crafting an essay outline, conducting research, or writing the paper itself.

What are you writing about? What is the style of your paper, and is it an academic essay or a free-form essay like a narrative essay? If the topic of your essay is “Do people who commit heinous crimes deserve the death penalty?” your title should not be humorous; it should be strict and to the point.

If your topic is “Why do people like watching funny cat videos?”, feel free to craft a funny title. Determine the tone of your essay and base your title on it—in consideration with the essay’s topic.

The tone can be:

  • Serious – “The implications of global warming”
  • Funny – “How cats and dogs love their masters”
  • Amiable – “Ways to fight depression”
  • Persuasive – “Why positive thinking is a must have skill for every person”
  • Informative – “Ten rules for creating a chemical at home”

The main goal of a title is to name its paper. There is no need to tell an entire story in the title, or provide any useless details. Sum up your paper in a few words! Another way to do this is to sum up your thesis statement, as it represents the main idea of your essay. Take your thesis and squeeze it into 3-4 words. Imagine that you are creating a title for your favourite newspaper or a slogan for Coca-Cola.

Don’t use fancy words! Take 2-3 main words (keywords), put them together, and stop wasting your time. Avoid jargon and abbreviations.

Search engine optimization (SEO) is something that can help any student and young writer reap benefits. While working on a title, detect the words related to the central idea of the paper. Type the words into the search field of Google and add the word “quote.” A search engine will show numerous web pages with in-text quotations that could be useful. Select the fragment you like. It is possible to learn how to make a creative title for an essay in this way.

Get Help Online

If you are not ready to pay for any online tools, apply a free title generator offered by one of the academic services you can find on the web. Keep in mind that such tools are not half as effective as a professional writing service like EssayPro.

Discover several more tips from experts:

  • Never forget the “What,” “Who,” “When,” “How,” “Why,” and “Where” questions (if you start with one of these questions, your title has a chance of getting noticed);
  • Come up with an unexpected image not related to the selected topic;
  • Sometimes, starting with a lie increases the chances of a title being able to catch an eye;
  • Review our catchy essay title examples.

Bad vs. Good Essay Titles

The best essay titles take papers and sum them up in a few words. To create a good one, a writer must consider their stylistic decisions and essay structure. Here are some examples from a veteran essay writer to show you what differentiates good and bad essay titles.

example of a good and bad essay title

BAD: How Television has Changed Our World – Too vast and not informative.
GOOD: The Electronic Babysitter: A Social History of the Uses of the Television – Gives an exact description of what the essay will be about.

BAD: The Ara Pacis Augustae – Unclear for people who do not know Latin.
GOOD
: The Modern Historical Significance of the Ara Pacis Augustae to the City of Rome – Here the reader understands what they will be reading about.

BAD: The Most Poisonous Frog – Not clear enough.
GOOD
: A Deadly Beauty: The Evolution of Skin Coloration and Toxicity of the Poison Dart Frog – It’s clear.

BAD: A Brief History of Subcultures and How They Manifest Themselves in a Constantly Changing Socio-Economic Environment – Too long and complicated.
GOOD
: Reconsidering Counterculture in Contemporary Society – Informative enough, brief, and to the point.

BAD: The Little Mermaid 29 Years Later: Selling a Harmful Sexist Message Through a Vivid and Attractive Image – Inappropriate language.
GOOD
: The Projection of Gender Stereotypes in The Little Mermaid – Appropriate language.

Bad titles fail to give an audience a sense of perspective. They are often generalized and therefore incomplete. Adding key information and structure to a title will make it informative and convincing.

After exploring how to write a title for an essay, it is time to move on and review some examples.

Essay Title Generator

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1 Insert specific keywords related to your topic into the box of the title generator tool.

2 Check the title generated.

3 Pick the catchiest variant and tell our writers which one you want them to use for your essay!

Why Should You Try an Essay Title Generator?

Free of Charge

Use the title maker for unlimited checks anytime you want. You don’t have to register to access a 24/7 customer support service as well.

Total Safety

We don’t store your works and titles in the system.

Easy to Use

The Title generator works real quick for any type of essay. You don’t have to insert your email as well.

Essay Title Generator – a Tool You’d Like to Have!

Did it happen to you that you already have a text, know the exact topic, and still can’t come up with the title? An accurate one helps to interest the readers and reveals the main idea of the entire text. This is one of the elements of your essay that help grasp the attention of your professor from the very first seconds he or she takes a look at your work. Thanks to an Essay Title Generator tool, things got easier. Learn more about what this tool is, how it works, and why you need it.

What is a Title Generator For Essays And Why Do You Need It

As much as the name says – it helps to produce a catchy title that will work for your paper. When you work hard on some text, you want the header to be precise and not general. Nevertheless, after a hard day, it may be difficult to pick one creative title even if you are a Harvard graduate.

This tool does all the dirty work for you and offers the proper name for your paper. In other words, it is one more tool that can simplify your life significantly. Our title maker is free of charge, meaning you can use it anytime you want. Besides, the number of checks is unlimited. The best thing is that the tool is easy to use so that you don’t have to puzzle over it.

How It Works

After you finish your work, you have an idea which words are the central ones in your paper. These recur throughout your work and uncover the main idea of the text. Paper Title Generator is like a vending machine. Your only task is to insert several keywords that best describe the topic of your writing into the box of the tool. Voila! Your original and clever title is ready!

What Benefits You Can Get

This is a convenient tool for sure, but is it the only benefit? If you visit our website, you will see some examples of creative titles for essays. What is more, we offer a unique opportunity to read the structure samples of the essays with these titles. In such a way, you can make sure that our tool is, indeed, worthy.

Our generating tool for essay titles is a must-have for those who ran out of good ideas and need an ideal header. The Title Generator is not only convenient but also extremely simple in use. You can take a deserved rest after a long day and receive an accurate header for your work. There are enough of the reasons to start using the generating tool, but the most important thing is the quality we offer.

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